May 2019-- BRANE Lab 2018-2019 Successes!

Congratulations to our BRANE lab members on all their hard work this past year!

Jennifer Yi matched for internship at Durham VA Medical Center and successfully defended her dissertation.

Yun Chen successfully proposed his dissertation.

Elizabeth Reese passed her comprehensive exam.

Catherine Paquette successfully proposed her Masters thesis and was awarded the UNC Injury Prevention Research Center (IPRC) Injury and Violence Prevention (IVP) Fellowship.

Surabhi Swaminath has been accepted to Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program at University of South Dakota at Vermillion.

Stephanie Martin has been accepted to Doctor of Pharmacy program at University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy at Chapel Hill.

Elissa Scherer successfully defended her senior honors thesis and was hired for two positions post graduation (1) Research Assistant at the Carolina Population Center, (2) Public Health Analyst at RTI International.

Kate Foray was hired as an Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) intern to Dr. Grillon at National Institutes of Mental Health in the Neurobiology of Fear and Anxiety lab.

Nick Rosenthal was awarded the Lindquist Undergraduate Research Grant to conduct research on campus antisemitism and was hired as an intern with the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

Dillon Rubalcava was awarded the J. Steven Reznick Diversity and Psychological Research Grant.

May 2019-- BRANE Lab 2018-2019 Publications and Presentations!

Publications

Yi, J.Y., Dichter, G.S., Reese, E.D., Bell, R.P., Bartuska, A.D., Stein, J.R., & Daughters, S.B. (2019). Neural reward response to substance-free activity images in opiate use disorder patients with depressive symptoms. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 198, 180-189.

Chen, Y., Daughters S.B., Thissen, D., Salcedo, S., Anand, D., Chen, L.H., Liang, H., Niu, X.Q., & Su, L., (In press). Differences in structural and item functioning of the reward probability index among Individuals from China, Taiwan, and the United States. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment.

Reese, E. D., Conway, C. C., Anand, D., Bauer, D. J., & Daughters, S. B. (in press). Distress tolerance trajectories following substance use treatment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Anand, D., Paquette, C., Bartuska, A., Daughters, SB. (in press). Substance type moderates the longitudinal association between depression and substance use from pre-treatment through a 1-year follow-up. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Chen, Y., Anand, D., Thissen, D., Chen, L.H., Liang, H., & Daughters, S.B. (in press). Cultural differences in behavioral activation across samples from China, Taiwan, and the United States. European Journal of Psychological Assessment.

Addicott, M.A., Daughters, S.B., Strauman, T.J., Appelbaum, L.G. (in press). Distress tolerance to auditory feedback and functional connectivity with the auditory cortex. Psychiatric Research: Neuroimaging.

Paquette, C., Magidson, J.F., Swaminath, S., & Daughters, S.B. (2019). Substance Use Disorders. In D.L. Segal (Ed.), Diagnostic Interviewing: Fifth Edition (pp.325-347). New York, NY, US: Springer.

Poster/Paper Conference Presentations

Chen, Y., Daughters S.B., Ma, H.F., Yan, H., Huang, Y,Z., Li, H.L., & Zhou, W. Feasibility and Efficacy of Behavioral Activation for Substance Use among Chinese Heroin Users. Poster accepted at the American Psychological Association (APA) Convention 2019. Chicago.

Martin, S., Scherer, E., Rosenthal, N., Mahn, L., Scherer, E., Reese, E., Yi, J., & Daughters, S. B. (2019, April). Pre-Treatment Cocaine Use and Distress Tolerance. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC.

Scherer, E., Martin, S., Wilson, E., Pippin, E., Zhong, J., Reese, E., Yi, J., Daughters, S. (2019, April). Discrepancy between Behavioral and Self-Report Distress Tolerance Associated with Anxiety Sensitivity, Depressive Symptoms, and Substance Use Problems. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC.

Foray K, Daughters S. (2019, April). A secondary analysis of emotional trauma, emotion regulation, and demographic variables in individuals with substance use disorder. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC

April 24, 2019-- Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium

Congratulations to the BRANE lab Undergraduate Research Assistants, Elissa Scherer, Stephanie Martin, Elizabeth Wilson, Erin Pippin, Joyce Zhong, Erica Scherer, Nick Rosenthal, and Lindsey Mahn for their successful poster presentations at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium on April 24, 2019.

Scherer, E., Martin, S., Wilson, E., Pippin, E., Zhong, J., Reese, E., Yi, J., Daughters, S. (2019, April). Discrepancy between behavioral and self-report distress tolerance associated with anxiety sensitivity, depressive symptoms, and substance use problems. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC.

Martin, S., Scherer, E., Rosenthal, N., Mahn, L., Scherer, E., Reese, E., Yi, J., & Daughters, S. B. (2019, April). Pre-treatment cocaine use and distress tolerance. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC.

Foray, K. & Daughters, S.B. (2019, April). A secondary data analysis of emotional trauma, emotion regulation, and demographic variables in individuals with substance use disorder. Poster presented at the UNC Undergraduate Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC.

February 22, 2019 -- Match Day SUCCESS for Jennifer Yi!

Congratulations to our very own, Jennifer Youngshin Yi, who matched at the VA Medical Center in Durham, NC. We are so proud of you!!

January 8, 2019 -- BRANE lab celebrates newly accepted publication

Anand, D., Paquette, C., Bartuska, A., Daughters, SB. (in press). Substance type moderates the longitudinal association between depression and substance use from pre-treatment through a 1-year follow-up. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Background: Research examining directionality of the relationship between depressive symptoms and substance use following treatment entry is limited. Furthermore, substances differ in their neurobiological effects on mood. The relationship between depression and substance use following treatment entry may be moderated by dependence on specific substances. The study tested (a) lagged effects between depressive symptoms and substance use frequency following substance use treatment entry through a 1-year post-treatment follow-up and (b) if substance dependence type moderates these effects.

MethodsParticipants (N = 263) entering residential treatment were assessed for DSM-IV substance dependence, depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), and percentage of substance use days at post-treatment, 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up assessments (time t0 to t4). Linear mixed effects models tested lagged effects between depressive symptoms and substance use frequency and the impact of substance type (i.e. dependence on alcohol, cannabis, opioid, cocaine, hallucinogen/PCP) on this relationship.

Results: After controlling for concurrent effects, substance type moderated each longitudinal relationship. Depressive symptoms significantly predicted substance use frequency at the subsequent follow-up assessment, only among individuals with pre-treatment opioid dependence (B = 5.55, SE = 0.89, z = 6.21, p<0.01). Substance use frequency significantly predicted depressive symptoms at the subsequent follow-up assessment, but not among individuals with cannabis dependence at pre-treatment (B = 1.01, SE = 0.22, t (524) = 4.49, p <0.01).

Conclusions:  The directionality of depression-substance use comorbidity may differ based on the substance of dependence at pre-treatment.Opioid users may especially benefit from treating both depression and substance use.

December 18, 2018 -- BRANE lab won an ice cream party!!

The UNC Clinical Psychology department hosts “Clinical Psychology Lunch Series” every Friday where faculty, post doctoral fellows, graduate students, and research staff come together to eat and attend a lecture on the latest research in the field. This year the clinical department held a friendly competition to determine which lab made the best food for the clinical lunch series.

Several labs competed and provided creative and delicious food, such as, vegetarian chili, tacos, and even a cereal bar! Though the competition was stiff, the BRANE lab came through with a BIG WIN providing pulled pork, macaroni & cheese, fresh veggie spring rolls, chicken wings, & sweet potatoes.

Shout Out to everyone in the lab who cooked this amazing food! & Three cheers for our win!

December 17, 2018 -- BRANE lab celebrates two newly accepted publications

Chen, Y., Anand, D., Thissen, D., Chen, L.H., Liang, H., & Daughters, S.B. (in press). Cultural differences in behavioral activation across samples from China, Taiwan, and the United States. European Journal of Psychological Assessment.

Objectives. Depression is prevalent in both China and Taiwan, and Behavioral Activation (BA), an evidence based treatment for depression, is ideally suited for cross cultural implementation. As a first step, the current study examined cross cultural differences in the understanding of BA constructs, by investigating item level differences in functioning between the English and Chinese versions of Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS and C-BADS; Kanter et al., 2007; Li et al., 2014). Methods. 752 college students were recruited from China, Taiwan, and the United States. Factorial invariance based differential item functioning (DIF) analysis was used to study item level differences in functioning for the BADS and C-BADS. Results. DIF was observed in the majority of BADS items, with items in the avoidance and impairment factors showing the greatest DIF. Conclusions. The constructs of avoidance and impairment demonstrate less cross-cultural generalizability compared to the activation construct. Suggestions for the implementation of DIF analysis for future cross cultural psychometric studies, and further modification of the C-BADS as a clinical assessment tool in China and Taiwan, are discussed.

Addicott, M.A., Daughters, S.B., Strauman, T.J., Appelbaum, L.G. (in press). Distress tolerance to auditory feedback and functional connectivity with the auditory cortex. Psychiatric Research: Neuroimaging.

Distress tolerance is the capacity to withstand negative affective states in pursuit of a goal. Low distress tolerance may bias an individual to avoid or escape experiences that induce affective distress, but the neural mechanisms underlying the bottom-up generation of distress and its relationship to behavioral avoidance are poorly understood. During a neuroimaging scan, healthy participants completed a mental arithmetic task with easy and distress phases, which differed in cognitive demands and positive versus negative auditory feedback. Then, participants were given the opportunity to continue playing the distress phase for a financial bonus and were allowed to quit at any time. The persistence duration was the measure of distress tolerance. The easy and distress phases activated auditory cortices and fronto-parietal regions. A task-based functional connectivity analysis using the left secondary auditory cortex (i.e., planum temporale) as the seed region revealed stronger connectivity to fronto-parietal regions and anterior insula during the distress phase. The distress-related connectivity between the seed region and the left anterior insula was negatively correlated with distress tolerance. The results provide initial evidence of the role of the anterior insula as a mediating link between the bottom-up generation of affective distress and top-down behavioral avoidance of distress.

December 6, 2018 -- BRANE lab members tackle Bandido's 5lb burrito challenge

The end of the semester is a stressful time, but the BRANE lab knows how to throw some excitement and friendly competition in to the mix! Congratulations to the four BRANE lab El Gigante competitors, (from L to R) Stephanie Martin, Elissa Scherer, Julie Maccarone, and Mike Loeffler.

Big shout out to our two champions, Elissa & Julie.

Elissa — “I’ve always known I would be good at competitive eating.” 

Julie — “I will never do this again.” 

        

November 17, 2018 -- Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Annual Conference

 The BRANE Lab was represented by one of its members at the Annual ABCT Conference this year. Congratulations on successful symposium and poster presentations to Yun Chen, M.A. who served as chair of the Transcultural and Transdiagnostic Application of Behavioral Activation symposium on Saturday, November 17, 2018. 

  

November 3, 2018 -- Dr. Stacey Daughters presents at International Society of Addiction Medicine Annual Meeting

Dr. Stacey Daughters traveled to Busan, Korea for the 20th International Society of Addiction Medicine Annual Meeting where she presented on the BRANE lab’s most recent tACS research.

Daughters, S.B. (2018, November). Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) trials in addiction medicine: Challenges, complexities, and hopes. In Verdejo-garcia, A. and Ekhtiari, H. (Chairs), NIG Symposium No 4 (Neurointervention 2): International Collaborative Network on Neuroscience-Informed Non Pharmacologic Interventions for Addiction Medicine: From Shared Protocols to Multi National Clinical Trials, at the 20th International Society of Addiction Medicine Annual Meeting, Busan, Republic of Korea.

For more information about this annual meeting you can visit the website at https://www.isamweb.org/

November 1, 2018 -- Catherine Paquette is awarded the IVP Fellowship!!

Catherine Paquette is the recipient of a 2018-19 UNC Injury Prevention Research Center (IPRC) Injury and Violence Prevention (IVP) Fellowship.

IPRC is a national leader in recruiting and educating the next generation of IVP researchers and practitioners. The goal of the fellowship is to support masters and doctoral students from diverse academic, professional, and demographic backgrounds and to allow them to gain a variety of mentoring and career development opportunity.

IVP Fellows work with IPRC-affiliated faculty mentors to identify opportunities to get experience conducting IVP-related research, programming, or policy. The fellowship will provide $3,000 per year to support travel, conference and meeting attendance, and other professional development or training opportunities. Catherine has been selected as a member of the 1st Cohort of IVP Fellows – congratulations, Catherine! 

October 9, 2018 --Catherine Paquette, MPS guest lectures at Columbia University

Our very own, Clinical Psychology graduate student, Catherine Paquette, MPS, was invited to guest lecture for the course “Bridging the American Divide” taught at Columbia University by Professors Raymond Horton & Bruce Usher. Catherine’s lecture focused on bringing awareness to the U.S. Opioid Crisis.

Course Description: Last year’s presidential campaign made it clear that Americans are a deeply divided people. It also gave rise to the recognition by many that they didn’t understand the lives and times of “the other half.” The purpose of this course is to help interested Columbia Business School students gain a better understanding through an outside of “the bubble” experience.

September 19, 2018- Welcome back from China, Yun!

Over the summer of 2018, Yun worked with a research team from the Wuhan Center for Disease Prevention and Control on a RCT examining the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of a Chinese translated Behavioral Activation Treatment for Substance Use (C-BA) among 90 heroin users seeking Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Wuhan, China. Under the supervision of Dr. Stacey Daughters and Dr. Wang Zhou (director of Wuhan CDC), Yun led the drafting of the entire study protocol, co-led the research staff training, and conducted C-BA treatment for 45 heroin users. The primary phase of the study is expected to be completed in Dec 2018.

     

May 21, 2018 - Congratulations Julie!

Congratulations to our BRANE lab manager, Julianna Maccarone who won the Psychology and Neuroscience Staff Excellence Award! It is such an honor and well deserved! We appreciate all of your work and dedication to the lab!

May 15, 2018 - Welcome Baby Devyani!

The BRANE Lab is happy to announce that our very own, Deepika Anand, welcomed her beautiful baby girl, Devyani, on May 15, 2018. Congratulations to Deepika & her husband & Happy Birthday to Devyani!!! The BRANE Lab already loves you!

May 13, 2018 - Congratulations BRANE Lab Seniors!!

Congratulations to Su Cho, Rachel Wells, Savita Madan, Alex Cowand, and Ethan Miller on their graduation from UNC & the BRANE lab. We’ll miss you guys!

April 4, 2018 -- BRANE Lab Baby Shower

Happy Surprise Baby Shower to our favorite Post Doc, Deepika!

We can’t meet to meet your new baby girl and for her to wear these very snazzy onesies we decorated for her! 🙂 

April 3, 2018 -- Congratulations Catherine Paquette

Congratulations to BRANE Lab first year graduate student, Catherine Paquette, who recently had two articles accepted for publication! 

Paquette, C.E. & Pollini, R.A. (in press). Injection Drug Use, HIV/HCV, and Related Services in Nonurban Areas of the United States: A Systematic Review. Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Paquette, C.E., Syvertsen, J.L. & Pollini, R.A. (in press). Stigma at Every Turn: Health Services Experiences among People Who Inject Drugs. International Journal of Drug Policy. 

Abstracts Accepted for Summer 2018 Conferences

Congratulations to our BRANE Lab team for their accepted abstracts at APS, CPDD and APA this summer!

Anand, D., Reese, E.D., Lindquist, K.A., Daughters, S.B., (2018, May). The impact of emotion differentiation on relapse, rumination, and depression up to 1-year post substance use treatment. In Seah, T. H. S. (Chair), Emotion Differentiation as a Protective Factor against Negative Self-Referential Processing: Links to Adaptive and Maladaptive Behaviors across Populations and Time Points. Symposium to be conducted at the 30th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco, USA.

Anand, D., Bartuska, A.D., Seitz-Brown, C.J., Daughters, S.B. (2018, June) The longitudinal association between substance use and depression following substance use treatment up to 1-year follow-up. Poster presentation at the 80th Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, San Diego, CA.

Chen, Y. (2018, August). An international students workshop: Processing challenging experiences and learning coping resources. In E.Wise (Chair), Translating psychological science and personal passion into social justice advocacy on campus. Skill-Building Session at the 2018 American Psychological Association Annual Convention.

Daughters, S.B., Yi, J.Y., Wells, R.M., Phillips, R.D., Baker, S., Carelli, R.M., & Frohlich, F. (2018, June). Effect of non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on inhibitory control among substance users in intensive outpatient substance use treatment. Oral presentation in “You’re Always on my Mind: Pre-Frontal Cortex in Addiction” at the 80th Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD), San Diego, CA.

Paquette, C.E., Magidson, J.F., Seitz-Brown, C.J. & Daughters, S.B. Effect of a behavioral activation treatment on reductions in HIV sexual transmission risk behavior from pretreatment to a 1-year follow up. Poster accepted for presentation at the 80th Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD), San Diego, CA.

Reese, E.D., Conway, C. C., Anand, D. Bauer, D.J., & Daughters, S.B. (2018, June). The impact of abstinence on distress tolerance trajectories from pre- to 1-year post substance use treatment. Poster to be presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD), San Diego, CA.

Yi, J.Y., Bell, R.P., Bartuska, A.D., McKay, K.G., Stein, J., & Daughters, S.B. (2018, June). Behavioral activation and right thalamic activation during monetary and environmental reward anticipation among opiate users in detoxification. Poster to be presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD), San Diego, CA

December 14, 2017 BRANE Lab Holiday Party

The Annual BRANE Lab Holiday Party was a success! Dr. Daughters hosted the party at her home where we all contributed to a delicious potluck dinner, followed by a white elephant gift exchange, followed by handing out Lab Awards. It’s our favorite lab event of the year! We wish all of our members could have been there!

Brane Lab Award Winners:

Most likely to…

  1. Have a dead body in the trunk of their car. Sydney
  2. Win a rap battle. Alexis
  3. Run for President. Stacey
  4. Die in a Zombie Apocalypse. Deepika
  5. Star on a reality TV show. Ethan
  6. Be a government spy. Catherine
  7. Have a secret family. Mike
  8. Win a hotdog eating contest. Julie
  9. Give up their career to travel the world. Savita
  10. Bake 10 dozen cookies for the lab (3-way tie). Yun, Liz, & Rachel

Additional awards…

  1. Most in need of brain stimulation. Mike
  2. Lab Mr/Miss Congeniality. Margo
  3. Road Warrior (most persistent tracker). Sydney
  4. BRANE Lab Bloodhound (most persistent recruiter). Mike
  5. Best Scan Time Team (with a time of 1 hr and 21 mins). Katie, Anna, & Savita
  6. Teamwork “Got yo back” Award (Undergrad/Post Bacc). Margo
  7. Teamwork “Got yo back” Award (Lab Staff). Anna
  8. Teamwork “Got yo back” Award (Grad Student). Jennifer
  9. Little Miss Sunshine (most positive lab member). (2-way tie). Margo & Savita
  10. Baby’s bottom award (smoothest in times of crisis). Deepika
  11. Drinking the water in Mexico Award. Jennifer
  12. Duct Tape award (can fix anything). Julie
  13. Xiaopeng’s favorite BRANE Lab Member. Anna

November 16-19 -- Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Annual Conference

The BRANE Lab was represented by three of its members at the Annual ABCT Conference this year. Congratulations on successful poster presentations to (from L to R) Deepika Anand, Ph.D., Sydney Baker, B.A., and Julianna M. Maccarone, M.A., MPH

October 13, 2017 - Welcome Baby Eden!

The BRANE Lab is happy to announce that our very own, Yun Chen, welcomed his beautiful baby girl, Eden, on October 13, 2017. Congratulations to Yun and his wife Yulu! & Happy Birthday to Eden!!! The BRANE Lab already loves you!

September 14, 2017 - LETS ACT RCT in press at Addiction

Congratulations to our many BRANE Lab members and their colleagues for their recent publication in Addiction:

The Effect of a Behavioral Activation Treatment for Substance Use on Post-treatment Abstinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Stacey B. Daughters, Ph.D., Jessica F. Magidson, Ph.D., Deepika Anand, Ph.D., C.J. Seitz-Brown, M.A., Yun Chen, B.A. & Sydney Baker, B.S.

ABSTRACT

Aims: to compare outcomes for a behavioral activation group treatment for substance use (LETS ACT), versus a time and group size matched control condition delivered in a residential treatment setting.
Design: single-site two-arm parallel-group randomized clinical trial with follow-up assessment at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment.Setting: residential substance use treatment facility in the USA.
Participants: participants were 263 adults [mean age 42.7 [11.8]; 29.3% female; 94.7% African American; 72.6% court mandated] whose insurance dictated 30-day (65.4%) or 90-day (34.6%) treatment duration.
Intervention and comparator: LETS ACT (n=142) is a treatment originally developed for depression and modified for substance use. It teaches participants to increase positively reinforcing value-driven activities in order to counter depression and relapse. The control group (SC; n=121) received time and group-size matched supportive counseling. Treatment was delivered in five or eight one-hour sessions depending on patient length of stay.
Measurements: percent abstinent at follow-up, percent of substance use days among those reporting use, depressive symptoms (BDI), and adverse consequences of drug use (SIP-AD).
Findings: LETS ACT had significantly higher abstinence rates at 3 months (odds ratio=2.2, 95% confidence interval=1.3-3.7), 6 months (odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval=1.3-5.0), and 12 months (odds ratio=2.9, 95% confidence interval=1.3-6.1) post-treatment compared with SC. LETS ACT participants reported significantly fewer adverse consequences from substance use at 12 months post-treatment (B=4.50, SE=2.17, 95% confidence interval=0.22-8.78). Treatment condition had no effect on percent substance use days among those who resumed use or on change in depressive symptoms; the latter decreased over time only in those who remained abstinent after residential treatment irrespective of condition (B=0.43, SE=0.11, 95% confidence interval=0.22-0.65).

Conclusions: a behavioral activation group treatment for substance use (LETS ACT) appears to increase the likelihood of abstinence and reduce adverse consequences from substance use up to 12 months post-treatment.

September 8, 2017 - Dr. Deepika Anand's Emotion Differentiation paper in press at Drug and Alcohol Dependence


Congratulations to the BRANE lab’s favorite Post Doctoral Associate, Deepika Anand, Ph.D. whose most recent paper was accepted at Drug and Alcohol Dependence:

Emotion Differentiation Predicts Likelihood of Initial Lapse following Substance Use Treatment    

Deepika Anand, Ph.D.; Yun Chen, M.A.; Kristen A Lindquist, Ph.D.; Stacey B Daughters, Ph.D.

ABSTRACT

Background: An estimated 40% to 70% of individuals treated for a substance use disorder relapse within one year following treatment (Walitzer and Dearing, 2006). Relapse is often driven by the need to cope with intense negative affect (Koob, 2013). Emotion differentiation, defined as the ability to distinguish among various emotion states, has been linked to better behavioral control in the face of negative affect (Kashdan, Barrett and McNight, 2015). The aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of emotion differentiation are associated with the risk of experiencing an initial lapse following entry into residential substance use treatment.
Methods: A total of 213 substance users (69.5% male, 94.4% African American, M age = 43.01 ± 11.35 years) entering residential treatment were assessed on study variables at pre and post treatment, and at 1-, 3- , 6- and 12-month post-treatment. Emotion differentiation was calculated using ratings on five negative affect items derived from the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS; Watson, Clark, Tellegen, 1988) at five assessment points.
Results: A Cox proportional-hazards regression model adjusting for age and negative affect intensity demonstrates that for every unit increase in emotion differentiation, there is a 27% reduction in the likelihood of initial lapse on any given day (OR = 0.73; 95% CIs [0.56, 0.95]).
Conclusions: The ability to differentiate among negative emotion states protects against initial lapse following treatment.

August 25, 2017 - Reducing Mental Health Stigma among International Students

Two of our very own BRANE Lab members, Deepika Anand, Ph.D. and Yun Chen, M.A. worked with Arun Nagendra, M.A. and Kimberly Pentel to reduce mental health stigma among International students at UNC.

This group of international graduate students and scholars working at the clinical psychology department at UNC invited other international students at UNC to attend an interactive one-hour discussion session. This session served as a safe place to explore some of the challenges of adjusting to life at UNC as an international student, discuss some effective, clinically-based tools for coping and adjusting, and review useful resources on campus.

We are very happy to report that this session was quite successful and we plan to continue working with our international population at UNC.

August 22, 2017 - Tribute to Avery Mitchell

On Wednesday August 16, 2017 the BRANE Lab came in to work to receive the devastating news of our cherished friend and colleague, Avery Devell Mitchell’s passing. We continue to struggle with this new reality, but we feel to not share what made him so special to us would be a disservice. Avery was passionate, supportive, vivacious, and overall a truly good human being. No matter the length of time you knew Avery, you spent every minute of it laughing or passionately discussing topics of the world today. He had a unique and ambitious drive to make a difference in this world and he spent every waking moment dedicated to that mission and yet still had the energy and time to encourage and support the rest of us AND enjoy his own life. Avery’s approach to life, his career, and his mission to help others (socially or professionally) will continue to be an inspiration to the rest of us as we strive to replicate his passion and selflessness in our own lives. Though, we would all much rather have our friend back, we will continue moving forward honoring his memory in any way we can.

The BRANE Lab misses you, Avery. We’ll do our best to make you proud.

 

             

      Avery being silly in a tree                                   BRANE lab hike to honor Avery                           BRANE lab “hot dog toast” to honor Avery                                        BRANE lab social event on 6/1/17     

August 2, 2017 - Congrats Stacey!

The BRANE Lab is EXTREMELY HAPPY to announce that our wonderful Director, Dr. Stacey Daughters, received a promotion to FULL Professor! Your BRANE Lab team is proud of you!

May 16, 2017 - Jennifer Yi awarded an NRSA

Congrats to graduate student Jennifer Yi who was awarded a NIH/NIDA Ruth L. Kirschstein NRSA predoctoral fellowship (F31) for her study, Working Memory Network Connectivity and Inhibitory Control in Cocaine Use. Hooray!!

May 9, 2017 - Baby Announcement!

The BRANE Lab celebrates the announcement of a new little lab member! Congrats to Yun and Yulu on the new baby girl!

May 3, 2017 - Katie McKay - Top Ten Scholar Athlete and Honors Thesis Presentation

The incredibly talented Katie McKay received the Top Ten Scholar-Athlete award and then raced to Davie Hall to present her senior honors thesis to the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience! We’re so proud of her!

April 22, 2017 - March for Science!

The BRANE Lab attended Raleigh’s satellite March for Science. SCIENCE, NOT SILENCE!

Image uploaded from iOS IMG_4617